Rick B
Lv 7
Rick B preguntado en Food & DrinkCooking & Recipes · hace 3 años

What causes chicken to be tough?

I have cooked chicken fast in a pan and slowly in an oven or crock pot. In both cases, it has come out tough sometimes and tender others.

A few recipes involve browning in in a pan, then finishing it in the oven covered in a sauce. Again, sometimes it is tough, sometimes tender.

What's the trick to tender but cooked through chicken?

Thanks!!!!

13 respuestas

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  • hace 3 años
    Respuesta preferida

    I find that cooking chicken in an iron skillet first browning on both sides then turn the fire down and covering the pan gets them very tender or cooking in the over not even covered at 350 until good and brown on the outside usually an hour and a half or 2 hours with larger chickens also comes out very tender but this is a whole chicken. What gets them tough is cooking all of the juices our of them which is why I keep the skin on for cooking a whole chicken in the over but the breasts I cook in the skillet are skinless and stay moist and tender. They are plump skinless breasts though. Now the part that is in danger of coming out dry are the breasts and the wings. The dark meat usually is very moist. So buy plump breasts and cook them the way I suggested and they should be moist and tender. And I find that cooking a whole chicken in the oven the way I do it tastes better than deep fried.

    I marinate a whole chicken in olive oil and sherry with garlic, oregano and some coriander powder seasoned salt and pepper then bake it in the marinade juices for an hour and a half to two hours at 350 and I like it much better than fried chicken. The whole surface is golden brown tinged with dark brown and the meat on the inside is juicy and tasty. If you are worried about fat don't eat the skin but fried chicken is loaded with fat but chicken fat is not he worst kind of fat because it doesn't get hard unless cooled or frozen. Yet still eating too much chicken fat is not good either. I also cook potatoes and carrots in the juices and the potatoes taste even better than the chicken cooked this way because they are kind of crisp on the outside and soft and tasty on the inside. The crust part is loaded with the flavor of the chicken and also the marinade as are any vegetables you might add in the last few minutes but if you add carrots you can par boil them first as you can with the potatoes but cut the potatoes in about inch and a half pieces or use the tiny new potatoes or even a can of whole potatoes. Guests always rave about this meal.

  • hace 3 años

    Temperature and time. Had the oven process been extended, it probably would’ve been excellent.

  • hace 3 años

    Mostly under-cooking or overcooking.

  • IvaB
    Lv 5
    hace 3 años

    for me,the answer for getting tender chicken every time is brineing-works like a charm.I'm adding this further thought a few hours later,but I think it might be necessary to say that brineing will not fix overcooked or undercooked chicken,but if you start with a brine-it will certainly help with tenderness in a large way imo

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  • hace 3 años

    Overcooking. Chicken, especially chicken breast, dries out easily. The one thing you can do to keep it moist is stop cooking it when it's cooked.

  • Anónimo
    hace 3 años

    Its upbringing.

  • hace 3 años

    The most common reason is overcooking. Use a thermometer. Remove the chicken from the cooking apparatus at no more than 160 degrees, and let it rest. I usually pull it off the heat at 155, cover and let rest. It will still be done.

    What part of the chicken, how big, or manner of cooking don't matter near as much as not cooking all the juices and flavor out of it.

  • hace 3 años

    Sometimes it is just the chicken. I have two recipes that are good - One calls for dredging in baking powder, then egg, then Panko, then baked at 400 degrees in a heated iron skillet with 1/4 cup oil for 15, flip and 10 more. The other involves searing chicken in ribbed iron skillet for 3 minutes per side, then roasting at 425 for eight minutes.

  • Anónimo
    hace 3 años

    Get a Meat Thermometer. Slow cooking is best.

  • Anónimo
    hace 3 años

    Need more info. Are you talking whole chickens? Chicken parts? White meat? Dark meat?

    Some chickens are just rubbery these days. The chickens at most grocery stores are bred to be way too big. I buy the smallest chickens I can find which is about 3.5 pounds if I'm lucky. They are better than the 5-6 pounders IMO.

    If your breast meat is turning out dry or tough, you're over-cooking it.

    Let us know exactly what you're cooking and by what method and we can give you some pointers...everything from roasting whole birds to pressure cooking to slow cooking to grilling to baking...each method has it's own tips and tricks.

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